Social Changes that are a result of COVID 19

I have found the social changes resulting from the coronavirus (COVID-19) to be fascinating. Most people appear to be staying home, minding their own business, and avoiding human contact either by choice or forced to do so by government regulations.

Pinellas County Sheriff, Sgt. Bryan Bingham talks with a couple reminding them of social distancing from others not in their household. Despite warnings and roadblocks dozens of vehicles made their way onto the Pinellas County side of Gandy blvd. at the unofficial Gandy Beach on the first weekend of the safer at home order on Sunday, March 29, 2020 in St. Petersburg, Florida. Deputies at one time responded to the area to remind citizens to keep their distance from others and avoid gathering in groups. (Luis Santana/Tampa Bay Times via AP)

As evidence, there is a groundswell in home improvement projects (just ask the hardware super stores whose profits are soaring). Other people are learning new cooking recipes, surfing the Internet, playing computer games, and watching a ton of television.

My brother-in-law tackled a thousand piece jigsaw puzzle while sipping on some rather fine bourbon, and others are getting caught up on their reading. There are even fewer cars on the road, at least down here in Florida. Life has definitely changed since the panic began and the social ramifications are eye-opening.

The people who were asked to work from home or have been furloughed are bored, frustrated, and chomping on the bit to get back to work. When our doors finally re-open, we will likely witness a productivity boom the likes of which we haven’t seen since World War II. Likewise, children are restless and want to return to school. It is interesting to watch Americans react to the shutdown. No, this is certainly not a vacation or holiday as people are sensitive to their ability to generate income and have become rather restless.

One area I found particularly noticeable in neighborhoods is the need for human interaction. First, I have never seen so many people walking or bicycling around the neighborhood, be it alone, as a couple, or with kids and pets. I didn’t realize how many dogs there were in my neighborhood. I also see people walking around who I haven’t seen in a number of years, and frankly, I thought they had moved out of the neighborhood.

Most interesting is how people do not hesitate to stop and talk with their neighbors, usually at the end of a driveway or in a front yard. The virus has caused us to become more neighborly, to ask about each other, if everything is okay, and to lend a helping hand when necessary. Kindness and consideration seems to be the order of the day and a renewed sense of neighborly responsibility.

Since the restaurants and bars are closed, we are seeing people get-together, not in large parties, but simple get-togethers to talk and even play cards. Maybe bridge and pinochle will finally make a come back. Needless to say, the consumption of alcohol has increased and the stores are doing brisk business. People may not be able to get a drink at night, but if government regulators ever close liquor stores, there would doubtless be an open rebellion.

This phenomenon of neighbors becoming reacquainted with their neighbors is healthy for communities as Americans do better when they pull together in times of crisis. This reminds me of the classic 1941 Frank Capra movie, “Meet John Doe,” starring Gary Cooper and Barbara Stanwyk, whereby Cooper’s character goes on the radio to promote the concept of “love thy neighbor.” This results in a social movement whereby people renew friendships with their neighbors and help one and other. This becomes the basis for forming “John Doe Clubs” across the nation. It’s an entertaining film with an important message. It’s also vintage Capra.

Yes, I am aware we are suppose to practice “social distancing,” and I believe my neighbors understand this. I just find it interesting how the virus has forced people out of hiding and caused them to think about their neighbors, to lend a hand, to pick up and deliver supplies, or some small menial task. It is refreshing to watch. Maybe there is a silver lining to this panic after all.

Keep the Faith!

P.S. – Also, I have a NEW book, “Before You Vote: Know How Your Government Works”, What American youth should know about government, available in Printed, PDF and eBook form. DON’T FORGET GRADUATION DAY. This is the perfect gift!

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Tim Bryce is an author, freelance writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 40 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at [email protected]

For Tim’s columns, see:   timbryce.com

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Copyright © 2020 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

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Tim Bryce is a freelance writer and management consultant located in the Tampa Bay area of Florida. As an avid writer and speaker, Tim discusses everything from business and management, to politics and morality, to systems and technology, and our ever changing world.