Some Doctors Glad That Florida’s Medical Marijuana Passed

Medical Marijuana Could Help Save Lives In Florida

While Florida was one of the key focal points for a Donald Trump victory, it also had some victories of it’s own—at least for 71 percent of the population. Amendment 2, the medical marijuana, amendment also passed on election night. The amendment passed with 71 percent of the population voted yes on it and opens up a lot more questions with how this drug will be regulated and implemented.

All across the United States, states have been passing a law allowing doctors to use medical marijuana to help those who are in too much pain to function on a day-to-day basis. Many of the patients are those who are diagnosed with cancer and the chemotherapy causes a lack of appetite. But how well does medical marijuana work and what does it mean for patients?

In this Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016 photo, pre-rolled marijuana cigarettes buds are displayed at the medical marijuana dispensary owned by Tim Blake near Laytonville, Calif. Blake supports the passage of Proposition 64, the Nov. 8 ballot initiative which would legalize the recreational use of marijuana, saying it's the next big step for an industry emerging from the shadows. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
In this Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016 photo, pre-rolled marijuana cigarettes buds are displayed at the medical marijuana dispensary owned by Tim Blake near Laytonville, Calif. Blake supports the passage of Proposition 64, the Nov. 8 ballot initiative which would legalize the recreational use of marijuana, saying it’s the next big step for an industry emerging from the shadows. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

“It depends on the diagnosis,” Dr. Joseph Rosado, who has been a big proponent of medicinal marijuana, said. “The THC helps with the nausea, anorexia and it addresses the nausea and the vomiting. It will also help them replenish their energy because they are able to eat. The CBD, the studies have shown, can cause shrinking of the tumors. “

Cancer isn’t the only disease that can be treated by medical marijuana Rosado said. It treats many other diseases such as epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, Crohns and multiple sclerosis.

In this Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016 photo, a tag identifies the type of marijuana plant on the medical marijuana farm of Swami Chaitanya and his wife, Nikki Lastreto near Laytonville, Calif. The pair supports the passage of Proposition 64, the Nov. 8 ballot initiative which would legalize the recreational use of marijuana. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
In this Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016 photo, a tag identifies the type of marijuana plant on the medical marijuana farm of Swami Chaitanya and his wife, Nikki Lastreto near Laytonville, Calif. The pair supports the passage of Proposition 64, the Nov. 8 ballot initiative which would legalize the recreational use of marijuana. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Rosado is one of many doctors who are happy to see this law passed. While there are still regulations that have to be sorted out by lawmakers in Tallahassee, he feels that this will help benefit some of his patients before it’s too late. Which is why he would like to see some changes regarding the 90-day rule where patients have to go to the same doctor for at least 90 days before getting treatment.

“I’m not an advocate for and I’m opposed to the 90-day rule,” he said. “I’ve had five patients pass away waiting for the 90-day rule. If you are considered terminal, and the definition in Florida is if [doctors] do nothing then you are going to die in a year, then you are going to spend a fourth of your last 365 days of your life waiting. That’s not compassion.”

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Thomas Fernandez is the managing editor for Sports Talk Florida and News Talk Florida. He started his career in media by covering the NHL and the Tampa Bay Lightning. After covering the NHL for two years, he hopped on board the news cycle and has been covering both sports and news for the last year. He has covered major sporting events as well as politics which affects the Florida audience. Thomas is a Tampa native and graduate of the University of South Florida with a bachelor of arts in Public Relations.